News

Disclosing MS in the Workplace : How, What, Where , and When

MS is not as disabling as people presume. Separating fact from fallacy, however, takes time. Once you’ve come to accept your diagnosis, and the adjustments it entails, new questions immediately begin to surface. Whom do you tell about your illness? When is it appropriate to disclose this information? How much do you tell and how do you tell it?

From a career standpoint, disclosure can be a complicated issue. You may be uncertain of the risk involved or whether your current job status will be jeopardized as a result. It is recommended that you familiarize yourself with your rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act, as well as seeking professional advice before disclosing any information. To read this story in its entirety Click on the link below: https://www.msfocusmagazine.org/Magazine/Magazine-Items/Posted/Disclosing-MS-in-the-Workplace-How,-What,-Where.aspx

Diabetes drug offers hope of new treatment for multiple sclerosis

Scientists have raised hopes of a new treatment for multiple sclerosis after animal studies showed a common diabetes drug can repair nerve damage caused by the disease.The effect of the drug was so striking that doctors in Cambridge are now planning a clinical trial of MS patients next year.If the treatment works as expected, it could potentially halt the progression of the disease and even allow patients to recover from some of the disabilities that typically develop as the condition worsens.“It’s always a leap in the dark when you go from lab experiments to humans, but the data is as strong and as compelling as it is ever likely to get,” said Robin Franklin, a professor of stem cell medicine at Cambridge University. “I am very optimistic that this is going to work.” To read the article in its entirety click the link below https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/oct/02/diabetes-drug-offers-hope-new-treatment-multiple-sclerosis

 

Mayzent® (Siponimod) Tablets Approved by the FDA

In a news release dated March 26, 2019, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of Mayzent® (siponimod) oral tablets to treat adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). The approval includes individuals with clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), and active secondary-progressive MS (SPMS). Mayzent is the only disease-modifying therapy (DMT) to be approved in recent years for active secondary-progressive MS. To read this article in its entirety Click the link https://mymsaa.org/news/mayzent-fda-approved/

Vumerity Approved in US as Treatment for RRMS and Active SPMS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Vumerity (diroximel fumarate) for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), including clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), and active secondary progressive disease (SPMS). Vumerity (previously known as ALKS 8700) was developed by Alkermes in collaboration with Biogen, the latter of which now holds the exclusive worldwide rights to commercialize the therapy. Taken orally, Vumerity is able to regulate immune responses and lower oxidative stress, helping to prevent the degeneration of myelin (the protective coat of nerve cells) in MS patients without inducing a systemic inhibition of the immune system. The therapy is rapidly converted into monomethyl fumarate (MMF), and although its mode of action is not fully understood, MMF is believed to have fewer gastrointestinal side effects than Tecfidera (dimethyl fumarate, also marketed by Biogen), an FDA-approved oral therapy for relapsing MS.To read this complete article click this link https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com/news-posts/2019/10/30/biogen-and-alkermes-announce-fda-approval-of-vumerity-diroximel-fumarate-for-multiple-sclerosis/

MS Muscle Spasticity: What It Is, and What to Do About It

The definition of spasticity reads like a description from a medical school textbook, but the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) calls it a “feeling of stiffness” as well as “involuntary muscle spasms” or “sustained muscle contractions or sudden movements.”

These symptoms may be as mild as simple muscle tightness, but they may become severe enough to produce painful muscle spasms as well as pain and stiffness in and around the joints.

Spasticity has been estimated to affect anywhere from 30 to 80 percent of people with MS. It most often impacts the legs in those with MS, often producing problems with balance and strength.

Still, the degree of spasticity, the muscles involved, and the resulting impairments vary from person to person, according to Alexius Enrique G. Sandoval, MD, medical director of the Multiple Sclerosis Rehabilitation Program at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore. To read this whole article click here: https://www.everydayhealth.com/multiple-sclerosis/symptoms/muscle-spasticity/

How a PT Can Help With MS-Related Fatigue

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of tremendous variability, but the most common — and often most debilitating — symptom of MS is fatigue.

Unlike “ordinary” tiredness, fatigue in multiple sclerosis is disproportionate to the activity being performed. And it’s not just associated with physical activity.

In addition to contributing to impaired balance and a reduced ability to walk, MS-related fatigue can cause diminished mental capacity and a feeling of tiredness no matter how much rest you receive.

Fatigue in MS is extremely complex and can have debilitating effects. But there’s evidence that an individually tailored exercise program can help, and that’s where a physical therapist (PT) can be of assistance. To read this article in its entirety click on this link: https://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/health-answers/how-pt-can-help-with-ms-related-fatigue/?eh_uid=84911080&slot=3&xid=nl_EHNLms_2019-07-20_17539216&utm_source=Newsletters&nl_key=nl_living_with_multiplesclerosis&utm_content=2019-07-20&utm_campaign=Living_With_Multiple_Sclerosis

FDA expands approval of Gilenya to treat multiple sclerosis in pediatric patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Gilenya (fingolimod) to treat relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) in children and adolescents age 10 years and older. This is the first FDA approval of a drug to treat MS in pediatric patients.

“For the first time, we have an FDA-approved treatment specifically for children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis,” said Billy Dunn, M.D., director of the Division of Neurology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Multiple sclerosis can have a profound impact on a child’s life. This approval represents an important and needed advance in the care of pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis.” to read the entire article click here:https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-expands-approval-gilenya-treat-multiple-sclerosis-pediatric-patients

 

UVa identifies surprising contributor to multiple sclerosis

School of Medicine researchers Megan S. Chappell, Alban Gaultier and Anthony Fernandez-Castaneda have identified a surprising contributor to multiple sclerosis that could lead to new treatments for the condition and possibly help doctors promote brain repair after injury.

Previously ignored cells are key contributors to multiple sclerosis, according to new research from the University of Virginia.

School of Medicine researchers were trying to establish the beneficial aspects of cells known as oligodendocyte progenitor cells, which make up about 5% of the brain and spinal cord and were thought to protect the myelin sheath that surrounds nerve cells.

In fact, they learned, progenitor cells contribute to the immune system’s attack on healthy cells during neurological diseases such as MS. To read the complete article click here: https://www.roanoke.com/news/uva-identifies-surprising-contributor-to-multiple-sclerosis/article_9a5e4405-eab7-592f-9f27-c2825099f73c.html

 

Bowel, Bladder Problems Linked to Higher Levels of Fatigue and Disability, Study Reports

Bladder and bowel problems, such as constipation and fecal incontinence, are associated with a higher level of fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study in Australia. The findings also showed that greater fatigue and experiencing bowel and bladder problems are associated with a higher level of disability. The research, “The frequency of bowel and bladder problems in multiple sclerosis and its relation to fatigue: A single center experience,” was published in the journal PLOS ONE. Bladder or bowel problems are frequent in people with MS, and may manifest as urinary incontinence or retention, slow intestinal transit, and chronic constipation. it is estimated that more than 50% of MS patients experience these problems. However, research on bowel dysfunction specifically, and on whether bladder and bowel symptoms are associated with fatigue and disability in MS, remain scarce. Now, a team at Neuroscience Research Australia conducted a single-center study to address these gaps. To continue to read more on this study refer to: Multiple Sclerosis News Today. com

FDA Approves Siponimod (Mayzent) for Multiple Sclerosis

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved siponimod (Mayzent, Novartis) to treat adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), including clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive (SP) disease, the agency announced.

Approval was based on results of the phase 3 trial, which randomly assigned 1651 patients with SPMS and an Expanded Disability Status Scale score of 3.0 to 6.5 to oral siponimod 2 mg once daily (1105 patients) or placebo (546 patients) for up to 3 years or until the occurrence of a prespecified number of confirmed disability progression events.

For most people, MS starts with a relapsing-remitting course, in which episodes of worsening function (relapses) are followed by recovery periods (remissions). These remissions may not be complete and may leave patients with some degree of residual disability. Many, but not all, patients with MS experience some degree of persistent disability that gradually worsens over time. In some patients, disability may progress independent of relapses, a process termed secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS).  In the first few years of this process, many patients continue to experience relapses, a phase of the disease described as active SPMS. Active SPMS is one of the relapsing forms of MS, and drugs approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS can be used to treat active SPMS. Later, many patients with SPMS stop experiencing new relapses, but disability continues to progress, a phase called non-active SPMS. To read more on this subject and review details on the trail performed, click here http://www.medscape.com And for additional information, click here https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm634469.htm

MS Alliance Of Virginia Presents Family Halloween Party

MS Alliance of Virginia Presents —  Hocus Pocus Family Halloween Party

Fun for everyone whose life has been affected by Multiple Sclerosis, Including caregivers , family and friends.  Come Enjoy Pizza, Games, Contests, Crafts and Music. Safe Halloween Fun For All.

WHEN: Saturday, October 26, 2019….. 6:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

WHERE: Holiday Inn – Tanglewood

COSTS: FREE

CONTESTS INCLUDE: Costume – Adults and Kids, Food – Bring your Favorite Treat, Spooky or Not, And Cupcake Decorating.

 

Muse Ball Field Music Festival

MUSE BALL FIELD MUSIC FESTIVAL

Featuring: Music, Food Trucks, Concessions, Car Show, 50/50 Raffle, Silent Auction, and More !!!!

Event Is this – Saturday, September 14th, 2019,  3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Admission: $5 Donation to Multiple Sclerosis Alliance of Virginia

(Please make checks out to Multiple Sclerosis Alliance of Virginia)

Please bring your Lawn Chairs, Blankets, and / or Tents

Location: 365 Muse Field Road, Rocky Mount, Va 24151

NO ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

All Proceeds to benefit the Multiple Sclerosis Alliance of Virginia

Coping With Anxiety in Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis is a disease that has both physical and emotional symptoms. Emotional symptoms such as stress, anxiety, worry, fear, frustration, and depression are common, and can be both a reaction to the disease and a symptom of the disease. Additional reasons why an individual with MS may have neuropsychiatric symptoms include the MS disease course, a reaction to a disease-modifying therapy, or a biologically mediated reaction / pathophysiology. This article addresses five ways to deal with emotional stress. To read this article in its entirely start on page 26 at http://msfocusmagazine.org

Taking Care of Your Emotional Wellness

Living with MS can definitely take a toll on your mood and emotional health. Often, people living with MS experience the loss of the person they were prior to the diagnosis, their social / familiar / professional roles, and physical ability. Frustration can become a recurring feeling when faced with the daily reminder of physical and cognitive challenges or the changes that have occurred over time. Questions about the future cause worry about what will happen next. To read the rest of this article with some great ideas, to address this issue read more starting on page 12 at http://msfocusmagazine.org

Experimental Medication Evobrutinib (M2951) Shown to Reduce Number of Lesions

Evobrutinib (M2951) is a oral medication being evaluated for potential use in relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis and in secondary-progressive MS. The agent inhibits Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), an enzyme that regulates the function of B cells and macrophages, components of the immune system shown to play a role in MS.

A recent Phase 2 study examined how various doses of evobrutinib affected the total number of T1 gadolonium-enhancing lesions seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at weeks 12, 16, 20, and 24 of trearment. The study also assessed safety, the annualized relapse rate (ARR), and MRI findings at week 24 and 48 to read more on this click here https://mymsaa.org/news/new-in-ms-research-july-2019/#7

Cannabidiol-based Oral Treatment Seen to Promote Remyelination in Mice

EHP-101, a cannabidiol-based experimental therapy for multiple sclerosis, was able to recover myelin in damaged nerve fibers and lessen neuroinflammation in a mouse model of MS, data show.

Emerald Health Therapeutics, the manufacturer of EHP-101 also announced plans to open Phase 2 clinical trials in patients by the close of this year.

The data on EHP-101 were shared at the 29th Annual Symposium of the International Cannabinoid Research Society (ICRS), Held June 30 – July 3 in Maryland, and suggest that EHP_101 may be a potential remyelination therapy. Click on the link to find the rest of this article at http://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com  released on July 9th, 2019, By Ana Pena

 

A Big Part of the MS puzzle

Back in 1994, shortly after she began work on her doctorate at the University of Athens and Greece’s Pasteur Institute, Katerina Akassoglou, PhD, made an important discovery. She and her fellow researchers found that mice that had certain types of immune system-regulating molecules in their brains developed mobility symptoms similar to those experienced bu people with multiple sclerosis.

Scientists at that time didn’t know about how immune cells acted inside the brain, especially in people with MS. Most of the studies prior to Akassoglou’s work focused on the role of the immune system in the body. The brain’s immune system was a whole new frontier, with the potential for more treatment options and targets for MS therapies than previously thought.

read this article in its entirely at http://nationalMSsociety.org/momentum

Pregnancy and MS. New research sheds light on effects of the disease

New research focusing on women with multiple sclerosis who are pregnant is shedding light on how the disease can affect them both during and after pregnancy. Key findings of two studies conducted by Maria Houtchens, MD, and her research team at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital show that women with MS are getting pregnant, although most do not use disease-modifying therapies for a year before and a year after pregnancy. Women with MS also tend to have more complications around the time of pregnancy compared to women without MS. Two-thirds of people with MS are women, and most are young when they get the MS diagnosis. To read this full article http://nationalMSsociety.org/momentum

 

FDA Approves Siponimod (Mayzent) for Multiple Sclerosis

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved siponimod (Mayzent, Novartis) to treat adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), including clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive (SP) disease, the agency announced.

Approval was based on results of the phase 3 trial, which randomly assigned 1651 patients with SPMS and an Expanded Disability Status Scale score of 3.0 to 6.5 to oral siponimod 2 mg once daily (1105 patients) or placebo (546 patients) for up to 3 years or until the occurrence of a prespecified number of confirmed disability progression events.

For most people, MS starts with a relapsing-remitting course, in which episodes of worsening function (relapses) are followed by recovery periods (remissions). These remissions may not be complete and may leave patients with some degree of residual disability. Many, but not all, patients with MS experience some degree of persistent disability that gradually worsens over time. In some patients, disability may progress independent of relapses, a process termed secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS).  In the first few years of this process, many patients continue to experience relapses, a phase of the disease described as active SPMS. Active SPMS is one of the relapsing forms of MS, and drugs approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS can be used to treat active SPMS. Later, many patients with SPMS stop experiencing new relapses, but disability continues to progress, a phase called non-active SPMS. To read more on this subject and review details on the trail performed, click here http://www.medscape.com And for additional information, click here https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm634469.htm

MS Focus Brighter Tomorrow Grant

Brighter Tomorrow Grant accepting applications June 1

MS Focus will be accepting applications for the Brighter Tomorrow Grant program June 1 through Sept 1. Each year, MS Focus makes dreams come true for people with MS through this program by providing goods and services – valued at up to $1000.00 per recipient – to people with MS nationwide. The goal is to improve the quality of life for people with MS by enhancing their safety, self-sufficiency, comfort, or well-being.

To qualify applications will be available by calling MS Focus at 888-673-6287 or at  http://msfocus.org